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Sturrock Report
Physical Evidence Related to UFO Reports
Peter A. Sturrock, Stanford University, in Journal for Scientific Exploration

The purpose of this four-day workshop was to review purported physical evidence associated with UFO reports, with a view to assessing whether the further acquisition and investigation of such evidence is likely to help solve the UFO problem, namely the determination of the cause or causes of these reports.

Seven UFO investigators presented a variety of physical evidence that they claimed was associated with UFO reports: photographic evidence; luminosity estimates; radar evidence; interference with automobile functioning; interference with aircraft equipment; apparent gravitational or inertial effects; ground traces; injuries to vegetation; physiological effects on witnesses; and analysis of debris. There was in addition a presentation of investigations into recurrent phenomena that occur in the Hessdalen Valley in Norway.

A review panel was composed of nine scientists of diverse expertise and interests.

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Biochemical traumatology as a potent tool for identifying actual stresses elicited by unidentified sources: Evidence for plant metabolic disorders in correlation with a UFO landing.
by Bounias, Michel C. L. (1990),  J. Scientific Exploration, Vol. 4, No. 1, p. 1.
Abstract--Following an accurate testimony of a "UFO" landing, samples of a wild strain of Alfalfa were collected at the epicentre and at various increasing distances of the trace left on the ground 4 and 40 days after the observation. An additional batch of similar samples collected 730 days after the observation was then used as an a posteriori control of the natural variability on the same area. Biochemical determinations included: photosynthetic pigments, free carbohydrates, and free amino acids. Statistically, significant results were observed by plotting concentrations versus distances from the epicentre, and various characteristic subtypes of dose/effect relationships were evidenced. Functional relationships between photosynthetic pigments, amino acids and carbohydrates, were reversed at D + 40 by comparison with D + 730 samples which exhibited a normal shape. Thus, the described principles of Biochemical analysis give evidence: (a) that something did happen; (b) that the influence of the unidentified source decreased with increasing distance from the epicentre; (c) of accurate symptoms that can be further compared with those elicited by known causes.

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UFO Reports Involving Vehicle Interference: A Catalogue and Data Analysis
by Mark Rodeghier
, Center for UFO Studies (in Journal of Scientific Exploration)
"These considerations, in conjunction with the existence of two strongly correlated groups of characteristics, argue powerfully against the hypothesis that all EM events are due to unknown natural phenomena. It cannot be denied that other facts mitigate against the strength of this conclusion, such as the rarity of events involving a diesel engine. But I believe that the evidence opposed to the hypothesis that all EM events are caused by a natural phenomenon (if not hoaxed or hallucinated) is stronger than any in its favor."

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UFO-Related Human Physiological Effects 
by John F. Schuessler, in Journal of Scientific Exploration
A significant number of UFO reports contain information suggesting that human physiological and psychological damage, animal reactions, and physical trace effects are caused by the UFO encounter. If this assertion is true, then we have an opportunity to provide the "proof" of reality sought by most researchers if we properly amass and utilize the results of the investigations. Important to researchers is the availability of historical data in a conveniently usable form. This document provides the first edition of a subset of the overall database - a catalog of UFO-related human physiological effects.

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Estimates of Optical Power Output in Six Cases of Unexplained Aerial Objects with Defined Luminosity Characteristics
by Jacques F. Vallee, in Journal of Scientific Exploration
Abstract -- An analysis of six cases of unexplained aerial phenomena observed by qualified observers over a twenty-year period in various parts of the Earth and in known physical conditions yields estimates of optical power output ranging from a few kilowatts to thousands of megawatts. This paper surveys the methods by which this parameter can be derived from witnesses' statements, it discusses the various hypotheses one could propose to account for the observations and it calls for a broad re-examination of sighting files in an effort to apply this methodology to a larger sample and to better understand the luminosity characteristics of the reported objects.

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