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Scott johansen
1/13/2004 9:50:26 PM

Dear anagram people For the love of God please Stop!!!!

Here are the origins of all of these words
They don't mean anything but what we know them to mean.Believe me there are easier ways to trick you or deal with you subliminally Like Christmas And Santa. If you are confused by any of this please stop wasting our time and go to the website I have provided.
http://www.etymonline.com/b5etym.htm


govern - 1297, from O.Fr. governer "govern," from L. gubernare "to direct, rule, guide," originally "to steer," from Gk. kybernan "to steer or pilot a ship, direct" (the roof ot cybernetics). The -k- to -g- sound shift is perhaps via the medium of Etruscan. Governess "female ruler" is 1483, shortening of governouresse "a woman who rules;" in the sense of "a female teacher in a private home" it is attested from 1712. Government is first attested 1553, from O.Fr. governement (replacing M.E. governance); governor (c.1300) is from L. gubernatorem (nom. gubernator) "director, ruler, governor," originally "steersman, pilot." Gubernatorial (1734, chiefly in Amer.Eng.) preserves the L. form
Roman - 14c., from O.Fr. romain, from L. Romanus, from Roma "Rome." The O.E. word was romanisc, which yielded M.E. Romanisshe. First attested use of Roman Catholic is 1605; Roman numeral (as opposed to Arabic) is from 1735; Roman typeface (1519) is opposed to Gothic (black letter) and italic. Roman "a novel" is 1889, from Fr. roman, from O.Fr. romanz (see romance); roman clef, novel in which characters represent real persons, lit. "novel with a key," first found in Eng. 1893. Roman nose is from 1624.
fly (v.1) - "to soar through air," O.E. fleogan (class II strong verb; past tense fleag, pp. flogen), from W.Gmc. *fleuganan (cf. O.H.G. fliogan, O.N. flgja, M.Du. vlieghen, Ger. fliegen), from PIE *pleu- "flowing, floating" (cf. Lith. plaukiu "to swim"). The O.E. plural in -n (cf. oxen) gradually normalized 13c.-15c. to -s. Notion of "flapping as a wing does" led to sense of "tent flap" (1810), which yielded (1844) "covering for buttons that close up a garment." The slang sense (n. and adj.) "wide awake" is 18c., perhaps from fledge. Flyer "small handbill or fly-sheet" is 1889, U.S. slang, from notion of "made to be scattered broadcast." Fly-swatter first attested 1917. Flying buttress is from 1669. Fly-fishing (from fly (n.)) is from 1653; while flying fish is from c.1511. Flying saucer first attested 1947, though the image of saucers for unidentified flying objects is from at least 1880s. Slang phrase fly off the handle "lose one's cool" dates from 1825. On the fly is 1851. Flypaper attested from 1851, though the thing itself is said to have become commonly available in London in 1848. Flying colors (1706) is probably from the image of a naval vessel with the national flag bravely displayed.
fly (v.2) - "run away," O.E. fleon (see flee). Fleogan and fleon were often confused in O.E., too. Mod.Eng. distinguishes in preterite: flew/fled.

blue - c.1300, bleu, blwe, etc., from O.Fr. bleu, from Frank. blao, from P.Gmc. *blwaz, from PIE base *bhle-was "light-colored, blue, blond, yellow." Replaced O.E. blaw, from the same PIE root, which also yielded L. flavus "yellow," O.Sp. blavo "yellowish-gray," Gk. phalos "white," Welsh blawr "gray," O.N. bla "livid" (the meaning in black and blue), showing the usual slippery definition of color words in I.E. The present spelling is since 16c., from Fr. influence. The color of constancy since Chaucer at least, but apparently for no deeper reason than the rhyme in true blue (1500). Blue (adj.) "lewd" is recorded from 1840; the sense connection is unclear, and is opposite to that in blue laws (q.v.). Blueprint is from 1886; the fig. sense of "detailed plan" is first attested 1926. For blue ribbon, see cordon bleu under cordon. Blue moon emblematic of "very rarely" suggests something that, in fact, never happens (cf. at the Greek calends), as in this couplet from 1528:
Yf they say the mone is blewe,
We must beleve that it is true.

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